For more than two decades, Shaykh Shabir Moosa has been serving his community in a range of roles – but particularly in Islamic finances. He heads up the Centre for Islamic Economics Australia (ICMEA), is a Certified Islamic Finance and Banking Advisor and Auditor, and has lectured in various disciplines of Higher Islamic Studies at Jaam’iah al-Ulum al-islamiyyah.

Given his vast knowledge and deep community roots, Shaykh Shabir was the ideal person to speak to about how to manage financially through these challenging times, while also aligning money decisions with faith.

For more than two decades, Sheikh Shabir Moosa has been serving his community in a range of roles – but particularly in Islamic finances. He heads up the Centre for Islamic Economics Australia (ICMEA), is a Certified Islamic Finance and Banking Advisor and Auditor and has lectured in various disciplines of Higher Islamic Studies at Jaam’iah al-Ulum al-islamiyyah.

Given his vast knowledge and deep community roots, Sheikh Shabir was the ideal person to speak to about how to manage financially through these challenging times, while also aligning money decisions with faith.

You can read part of the interview below or view the full interview with Sheikh Shabir.

It’s been amazing to see the community come together despite the health issues that have kept us apart. How have you seen this within your local community?

Perth as well as the rest of Western Australia have not suffered from COVID-19 as much as other communities have – may Allah protect one and all. But the community of course has come together in many ways.

How have you been delivering your sermons during this time? How have you overcome some of the challenges?

They say it’s during the time of adversity that is the time of greatest opportunity. This allowed us to start an online radio streaming station, which goes by the name of https://safwah.online. It’s a streaming service that was created because of COVID-19, and we now host a series of online audio-streaming programs and podcasts on the platform.

What are the top 3 questions you consistently get from your local community?

Without a doubt, 70% of the questions are related to finance, money, mortgages, super, halal income and careers-based matters.

Second would be questions around divorce, and third would be related to matters of halal and consumption.

With people concerned about money decisions aligning with their faith, what is the importance (from an Islamic perspective) of what one earns?

This is of the utmost importance, because ultimately our sources of income are what we nurture our bodies with. Your body should not be nurtured with anything haram.

What can we do on a grassroot level to educate ourselves on our Islamic options here in Australia?

Islamic finance is what really excites me. Here in Australia, we have an immense opportunity to base and replace the principles wherein Islamic finance can thrive. We are at a moment where finance and technology and fintech are merging, which has created many new opportunities.

What would you say to people, particularly in Melbourne, who are struggling through lockdowns?

Don’t be despondent. All hardships, trials and tribulations come from Allah. We should continue reciting from the Quran – particularly the six Ayat e Ash-Shifa – whenever there are anxieties or pressures or tensions because of the lockdown that people are facing in different parts of Australia.

Shariah law was passed down directly from the Islamic prophet Muhammad (PBAH). It is important to always be offering Allah your duas, not just when you feel concerned about the coronavirus pandemic or during Ramadan.

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Managing Director

Talal currently serves as a Non-Executive Director on the Whitlam Institute and Western Sydney University Foundation Council Board. He also serves as Chairman of First Quay Capital and Chairman of the Australian Arab Dialogue. Talal has also served on the Australia Post, Board of Sydney Ports, Macquarie University and the Western Sydney Area Health Service and the Chairman of the Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade; Council of Australia Arab Relations. In an executive capacity, Talal spent 10 years at PwC as a director and strategist, and at investment firm Babcock & Brown in the Corporate Finance Group and later in the Technical Real Estate Division. Later Talal held leadership positions in Better Place Australia, Platinum Hearing and Star Transport Australia.

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